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10 cities in danger Sea Level Rising

10 cities in danger Sea Level Rising

Building with Nature: wood is used for the restoration of mangrove forests in Indonesia

10 cities are in danger because of Sea Level Rising. And 44% of all people on Earth live within 100 miles of the shore.

Luckily, a growing number of studies have measured the risk from rising oceans, in different areas.

They made predictions for sea level rising in 2030, 2050 and 2070. 

10 cities in danger, measured as % of GDP

  1. Guangzhou, China
  2. New Orleans, USA
  3. Guayaquil, Ecuador
  4. Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
  5. Abidjan, Ivory Coast
  6. Zhangjiang, China
  7. Mumbai, India
  8. Khulna, Bangladesh
  9. Palembang, Indonesia
  10. Shenzen

Danger for developing countries

Developing-country cities move up the list when flood costs are measured as a percentage of city gross domestic product (GDP). Many of them are growing rapidly, have large populations, are poor, and are exposed to tropical storms and sinking land.

The study, (World Bank / OECD) forecasts that average global flood losses will multiply from $6 billion per year in 2005 to $52 billion a year by 2050 with just social-economic factors, such as increasing population and property value, taken into account.

Coastal cities could cost $1 trillion a year

Add in the risks from sea-level rise and sinking land, and global flood damage for large coastal cities could cost $1 trillion a year if cities don’t take steps to adapt.

Be prepared!

Protection and preparation are especially important. A devastating flood in a key city can stall the entire economy. Preparation will save lives and money in the future.

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