Coastal cleanup worldwide success

Coastal cleanup worldwide success

Hundreds of volenteers are cleaning the Foss coast Rye, Massachusetts

Coastal Cleanup 2017

Last coastal cleanup on September 16 was an amazing success.

This 32nd annual international action looks back on more than 6,000 events in 100 countries around the world.

Hundreds of thousands of people joined to clean the coastal area.

Ocean Conservancy

“From the Hawaiian islands to the Great Lakes, from Latin America to Hong Kong and everywhere in between, the International Coastal Cleanup represents a truly global movement for trash-free seas,” says Ocean Conservancy CEO Janis Searles Jones. “And we are so thrilled by the tremendous growth this movement has seen over the past three decades.”

Every year, millions of tons of trash, including an estimated 8 million metric tons of plastic waste, flow into the ocean. It not only pollutes the beaches but worse; sea live is killed because of the trash from nets, bags, bottels an more.

As worse as Climate Change

Fewer than half of the bottles bought in 2016 were collected for recycling and just 7% of those collected were turned into new bottles. Instead most plastic bottles produced end up in landfill or in the ocean.

Between 5m and 13m tonnes of plastic leaks into the world’s oceans each year to be ingested by sea birds, fish and other organisms, and by 2050 the ocean will contain more plastic by weight than fish, according to research by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation.

Experts warn that some of it is already finding its way into the human food chain.

Microplastic

Scientists at Ghent University in Belgium recently calculated people who eat seafood ingest up to 11,000 tiny pieces of plastic every year. Last August, the results of a study by Plymouth University reported plastic was found in a third of UK-caught fish, including cod, haddock, mackerel and shellfish.

 

Ellen MacArthur, the round the world yachtswoman, now campaigns to promote a circular economy in which plastic bottles are reused, refilled and recycled rather than used once and thrown away.

“Shifting to a real circular economy for plastics is a massive opportunity to close the loop, save billions of dollars, and decouple plastics production from fossil fuel consumption,” she said.

Related

Stop the plastic soup initiatives in this dossier

Stop the Plastic Soup (dossier)

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