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PowerWindow Breakthrough

PowerWindow Breakthrough

PowerWindows can be integrated with SmartWindows. 

This is a real PowerWindow Breakthrough. A new generation transparent solar energy generating windows will provide enough power to make buildings energy neutral. The founders: startup Physee settled in Delft (the Netherlands).

The powerwindows have solar cells installed in the edges at a specific angle that allows the incoming solar light to be efficiently transformed into electricity.

and its Smart:

With SmartWindow we integrate smart sensors in the window that sense the outside environment. SmartWindows control inside systems, such as Airconditioning and sun blinds, based on information about the outside conditions around the building.

The window coul generate 8 – 10 watts of energy. Enough to charge a phone per every square meter (11 square feet), two times a day, according to Physee.

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First PowerWindow installations

  1. With 30 square meters (323 square feet), the first installation of Physee’s PowerWindows in the new bank office, was a milestone last June. The bank’s employees are now able to plug their smartphones into the windows using USB ports to charge their batteries, according to Physee.
  2. At the end of June, the headquarters of the Amsterdam-based charity the Postcode Lottery were fitted with the PowerWindows.
  3. After that, Physee will move forward with its first large-scale project: a 19,000-square-foot (1,800 square m) installation in a large, newly built residential complex in Amsterdam, the Bold tower.

Physee said that the cost of the wiring that brings power from the grid to such windows is considerable in large commercial estates, and investing in power-generating windows would, therefore, make commercial sense.

Infrared

The next generation powerwindow technology is going on. The new PowerWindow will be coated with a special material that transforms incoming visible light into near-infrared light, which is then transported toward the solar cells in the edges of the windows. This second generation is expected to triple the efficiency.

“It works similarly to a glow-in-the-dark star,” founder Grapperhaus said. “The difference is that the glow star emits the green wavelength, but the coating on our windows emits light in near-infrared wavelength.”

The coating is based on the rare-earth metal thulium. Grapperhaus, together with his friend Willem Kesteloo, discovered the ability of thulium to transform a broad spectrum of light into near-infrared light in 2014, during their studies at the Delft University of Technology.