German roadmap green transport

German roadmap green transportTransport is one of the largest emitters of greenhouse gases (GHG) and thus the biggest contributor to climate change. Light battery electric vehicles are widely seen as the fastest and most cost effective route towards decarbonisation.

For heavy duty vehicle it seems to be less easy.

Transport & Environment Germany has been working on a roadmap how Europe could achieve zero GHG road freight and buses by 2050. Let’s have a look at the German recommendations: Read More

Vegetarian to reduce your footprint?

Vegetarian to reduce your footprint?Is a vegetarian way of consuming really reducing your footprint? Researchers concluded that a plant-based diet is the most effective way to contribute to the climate issue.

They listed four actions that could result in substantial decreases in an individual’s carbon footprint:

  1. eating a plant-based diet
  2. avoiding air travel
  3. living car free
  4. having smaller families

For example, living car-free saves about 2.4 tonnes of CO2 equivalent per year, while eating a plant-based diet saves 0.8 tonnes of CO2 equivalent a year. Read More

Coastal cleanup worldwide success

Coastal cleanup worldwide success

Hundreds of volenteers are cleaning the Foss coast Rye, Massachusetts

Coastal Cleanup 2017

Last coastal cleanup on September 16 was an amazing success.

This 32nd annual international action looks back on more than 6,000 events in 100 countries around the world.

Hundreds of thousands of people joined to clean the coastal area. Read More

WaterBattery For On-The-Go Energy Storage

WaterBattery For On-The-Go Energy Storage

The new water battery can only cycle in the range of 50-100

US Army researchers developed New ‘WaterBattery’ for ‘On-The-Go’ Energy Storage. 

The announcement was made on Science Direct. The researchers:

In summary, we successfully resolved the “cathodic challenge” of aqueous electrolytes by designing a unique inhomogeneous electrolyte additive approach to minimize competitive water reduction on graphite or Li-metal surfaces during the interphase formation.

Upon reductive decomposition during the first charging process, the highly fluorinated additive forms a protective interphase that enables the reversible cycling of both graphite and Li-metal anodes in aqueous electrolytes.

Read More

Finland could stay warm with Solar Power

Finland could stay warm with Solar PowerIn Finland, households could stay warm with Solar Heat.

Solar heating could provide between 53% and 81% of annual domestic heating energy consumption according to a new study, done by the Aalto University in Finland. Read More

HEROES project removes barriers PV-Grid Integration

HEROES project tackles PV-Grid Integration

The EU HEROES project removes barriers PV-Grid Integration in various countries

The European HEROES project in which seven European countries participate intents to remove barriers to the integration of solar power into the grid.

The kick-off will take place in The Hague on 19 and 20 September.

Read More

Promising step in nuclear fusion research

Promising step in nuclear fusion research

The new wall of liquid metal appeared to remain cooler and is capable of repairing itself constantly

A layer of liquid metal may be the anwer to the temperature problem of nuclear fusion. An important obstacle which had to be solved is that the reactor wall is resistant to extremely high temperatures released during power generation.
In Nature Communications, Dutch scientists published a breakthrough for this problem. They discovered that the wall of a reactor can be protected with a thin layer of liquid metal.
Read More

Green Cement is a growing Market

Green Cement is a growing Market

Green Cement is a growing Market

The global market for Green Cement is expected to more than double between 2016 and 2024 as sustainability becomes a priority for the construction industry. 

The global market is estimated to grow at a substantial pace in the next few years, thanks to the rising encouragement from governments across the world. Read More

MoS2 Nanopores Desalination

MoS2 Nanopores

Tiny holes called nanopores, is specially designed to let high volumes of water through but keep salt and other contaminates out

MoS2 Nanopores, developed by the University of Illinois, seems to be an energy-efficient technique for removing salt from seawater. The material, a nanometer-thick sheet of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) riddled with tiny holes called nanopores, is specially designed to let high volumes of water through but keep salt and other contaminates out, a process called desalination. Read More

New Cement with huge Carbon Reductions

New Cement with huge Carbon Reductions

If successful, the new cement will generate more CO2 reductions annually than all the traffic in a country.

Prof. Dr. Ir. H.J.H. Brouwers (University Eindhoven) investigates whether cement can be made of a steel industry waste: slag (metallurgy).

If successful, the new cement will generate more CO2 reductions annually than all the traffic in a country. Read More

More rain, less snow on Arctic

More rain, less snow on Arctic

According to climate researchers, more rain than snow will fall in the Arctic. Moreover, oceans are getting hotter, and they’re also losing oxygen

According to climate researchers in the Netherlands, at the end of this century more rain than snow will fall in the Arctic. It was already known that, due to global warming, up to 60% more precipitation would fall in the Arctic.

The researchers now argue that it mainly involves rain, while scientists always presuppose the precipitation would be snow. Read More

Graphene promising as superconductor

Graphene promising as superconductor

It’s official: graphene has been made into a superconductor in its natural state – which means electrical current can flow through it with zero resistance. Foto Stanford University

Graphene is super light, flexible, very strong and a good conductor. But now the wonder carbon graphene, seems to reach the holy grail: superconductivity.

For the first time, Cambridge researchers have shown that graphene (only one atomic layer) is able to pass electric current without any resistance. Read More

100% renewables for South America

100% renewables for South America

The researchers compared the results with former studies of North America, Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, Central Asia and Russia, the Middle East and Northern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa and Europe.

A study by Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd. shows that a 100% renewables is the cheapest electricity production option.

The transition can be achieved with very few energy storages and could be realized by 2030.  Read More

Pacific Plastic Soup worser than we thought

Pacific Plastic Soup worser than we thought

An aerial survey, a C130 Hercules aircraft was fitted with state-of-art sensors from Teledyne Optech, whose Coastal Zone Mapping and Imaging Lidar (CZMIL) can detect objects at oceanic depths of tens of meters

The Pacific Garbage Patch survey concluded: ‘It’s Worse Than We Thought’.

Boyan Slat, the 22-year-old Dutch inventor and CEO behind The Ocean Cleanup, announced today preliminary results of the organization’s latest major research mission, the Aerial Expedition, the first-ever aerial survey of an ocean garbage patch, also called ‘the plastic soup‘. Read More

Positive business case producing hydrogen on Oil Platforms North Sea

oil platform s

Important additional returns for society can be that less investment is required in offshore power grid to the extent that existing gas grid can be used to get offshore wind energy onshore.

An interesting study of the Energy Delta Institute remained unnoticed for two months: it could be financially attractive to produce hydrogen at unemployed oil platforms in the North Sea with wind energy that is extracted at sea nearby. 

In a report launched November 2015, EDI presented the findings of a study on a simulated wind-and-gas-energy-conversion pilot project in the North Sea. Read More

20% of the world’s population will migrate by sea-level rise

Sea-level rising: populations at risk

Even if global warming is capped at 2C, 20% of the world’s population will have to migrate away from coasts swamped by rising oceans. 

Even if global warming is capped at governments’ target of 2C, 20% of the world’s population will be to migrate to higher area’s because of rising sea levels.

Countries like the Netherlands and Bangladesh and cities including New York, London, Rio de Janeiro, Cairo, Calcutta, Jakarta and Shanghai would all be submerged because of melting polar ice caps and sea-level rise. Read More

Nocera bacteria absorb CO2

Nocera CO2 absorbing bacteria Ralstonia Eutropha

The bacterium Ralstonia eutropha (picture Wikipedia)

Professor Daniel G. Nocera (Harvard) has succeeded in changing bacteria genetically so that they can absorb CO2 and convert it into alcohol.

This news has been reported by the American magazine Forbes. But, according to Nocera:

this bacteria does not solve the CO2 problems.

Read More

Delta Areas protected by Int. Coalition

Delta Areas protected by Int. Coalition

Women plant mangroves to protect the land against Sea Level Rising
Mangrove, the tree that captures carbon, filters saltwater, and stops storms

Delta Areas will be protected by an International Coalition.

That’s the result of the international climate conference ‘Adaptation Futures’, May 11th in Rotterdam.

Countries agreed to work together to create resilient urban delta areas against a rising sea level rising because of the climate change. Read More

Sea Level nearly doubles

Sea Level Rising nearly doubles

Antarctica has the potential to contribute more than a meter of sea-level rise by 2100 and more than15 meters by 2500

By the end of this century, the sea level nearly doubles: The sea would rise twice as high as predicted so far.

This is what researchers Robert DeConto and David Pollard reported in Nature. Read More

Research Report Smart Cities

Delft - Research Report Smart Cities 2015 - 2050

Smart urban design requires an integrated look at the city as a complex of material flows and living environment, which exposes the connections between sources, functions, infrastructure and users.

This Research Report ‘Smart Cities’ has been published by the University Delft. The researchers consider Smart Cities as a way of working on a future-proof city, cleverly making use of people, resources and systems.

In this Delft Smart City research project, students examined the possible impact of recent developments under the heading ‘Smart City’ for Delft.

Read More

Gas leak Aliso mega impact

Gas leak Aliso mega impact

According to the researcher, the gas leak will have a substantial impact on the emission targets of the State of California. The effect of the emitted methane will continue for years.

According tot researchers in Science, the gas leak in the gas storage plant in Aliso Canyon (Los Angeles – USA) lost as much methane as an average EU country’s annual emissions like the Netherlands.

It’s the largest methane leak in the history of the US.

This leak can be compared with the environmental disaster of the oil rig Deepwater Horizon. Read More

The world could be 100% renewable by 2050

circular architecture, CO2, design, Green building, Halprin, inspiring place, light, Sea Ranch California, Sustainable infrastructure

Adoption of a global green energy infrastructure would provide power to 4 billion! people and the energy independence of countries would eliminate a major cause of global conflict.

A new study by Stanford University’s Atmosphere/Energy Program makes the case that the world could be fully powered by renewable energy as early as 2050 by detailing the necessary resources for each country.

Researchers analyzed energy roadmaps for 139 countries and calculated how much energy they would need to meet demand for:

  • household electricity
  • industry
  • agriculture
  • transportation
  • heating
  • cooling

Read More

From CO2 to Valuable Carbon Nanofibers

From CO2 to strong and valuable nanofibers, this is a high potential technology

The strong nanofibers can be used for strong carbon composites which are used in planes, bikes, wind turbine blades and space equipments.

In 2015, a research team from the George Washington University presented a technology that converts CO2 (directly from the air) into highly valued carbon nanofibers for industrial and consumer products. 

The strong nanofibers can be used for strong carbon composites which are used in planes, bikes, wind turbine blades and space equipments. Read More

5 Promising Technologies to make Fuel out of CO2

CO2, carbon, recycling, fuel, e-diesel, climate change, sun power, concentrated solar power, research

EU Project Uses Sun to Turn Water and CO2 Into Jet Fuel

We were wondering which new process could make green energy out of CO2. So we searched on the internet and filtered 5 beautiful technologies for you.

Let’s stop the carbon and change the world into a green planet.

Take a look. Read More