Normandy: Surfing scientist studies harmful algae blooms, which are poisonous for fish and even humans

Normandy surfing scientist

Normandy: surfing scientist Bob Brewin 

Normandy: Bob Brewin is pioneering a new technique in satellite oceanography – by going surfing. 

The Plymouth Marine Laboratory scientist uses his board to take sea surface temperature measurements, and then use them to better interpret data from European satellite Sentinel-3. Read More

Plastic Oceans Increasingly Risk of Diseases

Plastic Oceans Increasingly Risk of Diseases

Village in Myanmar, Dr Kathryn Berry

New research shows that the increasing plastic waste in Oceans is a real threat for the health of the animals and plants like corals.

The risk of infection and disease outbreaks by as much 89 percent.

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Ocean Cleanup presents Floating Screens

Ocean Cleanup presents Floating Screens

According to Boyan Slat, the increased efficiency of the system, allows for the cleanup of half the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in just 5 years.

Dutch foundation The Ocean Cleanup announced it will start extracting plastic from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch with a new concept: Floating Screens. The new developed technology is based on floating ‘anchors’, instead of the initially planned fixed anchors.

Series of floating anchors (two black structures) are to keep the screen in place.

The cleanup system is already tested. Read More

Finland could stay warm with Solar Power

Finland could stay warm with Solar PowerIn Finland, households could stay warm with Solar Heat.

Solar heating could provide between 53% and 81% of annual domestic heating energy consumption according to a new study, done by the Aalto University in Finland. Read More

What Shell knew about climate change in 1991

What Shell knew about climate change in 1991

In 1989, the organization changed the design of a drilling platform in order to take account of extreme weather and rising sea levels.

Shell produced a report on global warming called ‘Climate of Concern’ in 1986. In 1991 they made the video documentary for the public. It warned that trends in global temperatures raised serious risks of famines, floods and climate refugees.

But in the quarter century since, Shell has continued to invest heavily in fossil fuels. 

Already in the eighties, Shell understood that climate change would affect its own operations. In 1989, the organization changed the design of a drilling platform in order to take account of extreme weather and rising sea levels.

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100% renewables for South America

100% renewables for South America

The researchers compared the results with former studies of North America, Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, Central Asia and Russia, the Middle East and Northern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa and Europe.

A study by Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd. shows that a 100% renewables is the cheapest electricity production option.

The transition can be achieved with very few energy storages and could be realized by 2030.  Read More