Within 15 years, MIT expects to produce energy from fusion

MIT Fusion SPAEC Tokamak experiment

Visualization of the proposed SPARC tokamak experiment. Using high-field magnets built with newly available high-temperature superconductors, this experiment would be the first controlled fusion plasma to produce net energy output. Visualization by Ken Filar, PSFC research affiliate

Within 15 years, MIT expects to produce energy from fusion. MIT and Commonwealth Fusion Systems (CFS) collaborate in a new US initiative and decided to take a radically different approach to other efforts to transform fusion fram an exensive science experiment into a viable commercial energy source.

The team intend to use a new class of high-temperature superconductors they predict will allow them to create the world’s first fusion reactor that produces more energy than needs to be put in to get the fusion reaction going. Read More

Graphene promising as superconductor

Graphene promising as superconductor

It’s official: graphene has been made into a superconductor in its natural state – which means electrical current can flow through it with zero resistance. Foto Stanford University

Graphene is super light, flexible, very strong and a good conductor. But now the wonder carbon graphene, seems to reach the holy grail: superconductivity.

For the first time, Cambridge researchers have shown that graphene (only one atomic layer) is able to pass electric current without any resistance. Read More

Yet nuclear fusion?

nuclear power, fusion, electric, green energy, pros and cons, pro's, MIT, semiconductor

The breakthrough is due to the availability of superconductors, made of barium copper oxide

Just about the Holy Grail of clean energy: nuclear fusion, which – unlike nuclear fission – produces no waste.

An infinite source of clean energy. But until now, not into practice. He? What says MIT? Read More